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Reed Tidal Marsh-Community Mixtures

Previous posts showed Reed Tidal Marsh that is totally or nearly totally composed of reed grass (Phragmites australis).  What do you do if there are other signatures present?  Here are some examples:

Combination of Salt Shrub and Reed Tidal Marsh

Pictured below is a situation in the Murderkill River watershed where you have a signature of Reed Tidal Marsh with salt shrub (Baccharis halimifolia).  In this case the salt shrub gives the Reed Tidal Marsh signature a somewhat darker look.  However, reed grass is still dominant to the signature and the salt shrub is minor.  The entire combination nearly surrounds an island with wax-myrtle (Morella cerifera) with a dense tangle of common greenbrier (Smilax rotundifolia).  Irregularly Flooded Eastern Tidal Salt Shrub has salt shrub as the dominant or co-dominant in Delaware.  Look for this community in a future post.

Picture of Reed Tidal Marsh with Salt Shrub

                           Combination of Reed Tidal Marsh and Salt Shrub

 

Combination of Wax-Myrtle and Reed Tidal Marsh

Pictured below is a location in the Murderkill River watershed where you have wax-myrtle (Morella cerifera) and Reed Tidal Marsh together.  Note that the wax-myrtle signature (the light red blobs) has reed grass in and among it giving it a muted look.  However, like the example above, reed grass is still dominant.  A future post will discuss wax-myrtle in more detail.

Picture of Reed Tidal Marsh with Wax-myrtle

                          Combination of Reed Tidal Marsh and Wax-Myrtle

 

Combination of Loblolly Pine and Reed Tidal Marsh

Pictured below is another location in the Murderkill River watershed.  In this case there is a combination of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) and the two species covered previously.  However, like the other two examples, reed grass is still dominant.  In this example there are approximately three individuals of loblolly pine, which have a pink cotton candy look.  Smaller and shorter wax-myrtle (Morella cerifera) surround the pine.

Picture of Reed Tidal Marsh with Pine

                                  Combination of Reed Tidal Marsh and Pine

 

Combination of Salt Meadow Hay and Reed Tidal Marsh

Pictured below is a location of Blackbird Creek near its mouth with Delaware Bay.  Delineated in blue is the marsh that was my example for a high density cotton marsh in an earlier post.  If you look below the blue line you will see a cottony white area.  This area is salt meadow hay mixed with reed grass.  In this case however the salt meadow hay wins the dominance competition and is classed as North Atlantic High Salt Marsh (has a white signature and salt meadow hay is dominant).  More reed grass leads to a darker signature because of less salt meadow hay and a determination of Reed Tidal Marsh.

If you look around the picture you will see additional white areas that are North Atlantic High Salt Marsh that do not look cottony and do have the reed grass mixed in.  A future post will discuss North Atlantic High Salt Marsh.

Picture of High Density Dirty Cotton Marsh

                      Combination of Reed Tidal Marsh and Salt Meadow Hay

Note on Murderkill River watershed

You may have noticed above that I have a number of examples from the Murderkill River watershed.  The Murderkill River contains a lot of unique situations.  It is one of the hardest watersheds and one of the most interesting in Delaware.  This especially so when looking at historical imagery.

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